Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy works by stopping or slowing the growth of cancer cells, which grow and divide quickly, such as those that line your mouth and intestines or cause your hair to grow. Damage to healthy cells may result in side effects. Often the side effects of chemo get better or go away after chemotherapy is completed.

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

About Chemotherapy?

What does Chemotherapy do?

Depending on your type of cancer and how advanced it is, chemotherapy can:

  • Cure cancer – when chemotherapy destroys cancer cells to the point that your doctor can no longer detect them in your body, and they will not grow back.
  • Control cancer – when chemotherapy keeps cancer from spreading, slows its growth or destroys cancer cells that have spread to other parts of your body.
  • Ease cancer symptoms (also called palliative care) – when chemotherapy shrinks tumours that are causing pain or pressure.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.

About Chemotherapy?

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
TIPS FOR MEETING WITH YOUR DOCTOR OR NURSE
  • Make a list of your questions before each appointment. Some people keep a “running list’ and write down new queries as they think of them. Make sure to have space on the list to write down the answers from your Doctor or Nurse.
  • You are welcome to bring a family member or a trusted friend to your medical visits. This person can help you to understand what the doctor or nurse said and can talk with you about your appointment.
  • Ask all your questions. There is no such thing as a stupid question. If you do not understand an answer, please ask the team to explain further until you are comfortable with the answer.
  • Let your doctor or nurse know how much information you want. Some people want to learn everything they can about cancer and its treatment, others only want limited information. The choice is yours.

Side Effects

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
WHEN SHOULD YOU CALL YOUR DOCTOR?
Diarrhoea typically causes stomach cramps and loose, watery stools. Mostly it’s an inconvenience, but if your symptoms persist or get worse, it could be a sign of something more serious. Diarrhoea can also lead to other problems, such as severe dehydration.
Some signs and symptoms are more serious than others are. Call your doctor right away if you have any of the following:
  • Six or more loose bowel movements a day for more than two days.
  • Blood in your stool
  • Inability to urinate for 12 hours or more
  • Inability to drink liquids
  • Weight loss due to diarrhoea
  • Diarrhoea after several days of constipation
  • Severe abdominal pain
  • Fever of 38.3ºC or higher
  • Shaking chills
  • If your diarrhoea doesn’t seem severe but starts to interfere with your daily activities, such as if you’re concerned about leaving home or going somewhere without a bathroom nearby, talk to your doctor. If abdominal cramping is keeping you from your daily activities, discuss this with your doctor as well..